Introduction
  • This is a glossary of terms commonly used by Japanese players to describe certain parts, features, functions or other aspects of DIVA AC.
  • Romaji will be provided in square brackets, with kanji and hiragana displayed as small letters and katakana as capital letters.
  • Where abbreviations are used, they will be marked as (abbr).
  • The terms "arcade cabinet" and "arcade machine" are used interchangeably.
  • Unless otherwise stated in italics, everything here is translated directly from the DIVA AC Japanese wiki.

Basic Terms
  • 筐体 [kyoutai] - The actual arcade cabinet housing the hardware upon which the Project DIVA Arcade software is run.

  • AC - Arcade Computer (abbr). While technically defined as the hardware inside an arcade cabinet, it is more commonly used to refer to the arcade version of a game.
    • アケ版 [AKEban] - An alternate writing/reading in Japanese if one does not wish to use English. アケ (arcade) 版 (version).

  • CS - Consumer Software (abbr). The version of the game on home consoles.
    • In the case of Project DIVA, refers directly to the PSP versions.

  • クレ・クレジット [KURE or KUREJITTO] - Credits. Nowadays most arcade games accept credits in 100 yen coins.
    • The value of a single credit cannot be defined as it differs from store to store.

  • ランカー [RANKAA] - Ranker. Someone who has entered into the official highscore rankings for a song.

  • 全一 [zen'ichi] - Number 1 in the whole country. 全 (all/whole) 一 (first).
    • Used as a prefix, such as 全一プレイヤー [~PUREIYAA] or 全一スコア [~SUKOA] which mean number 1 player and number 1 score respectively.

  • 連コ・連コイン・連投 [renKO or renKOIN or rentou] - A situation where a player hogs the machine by continuously putting in coins. 連 (continuous) コイン (coins).
    • Needless to say, this is extremely terrible manners. Give the people who are queuing their turns. It is best to take a look around after every game to see whether anyone else is waiting.
    • Failing the first song with an early Game Over does not excuse this act. However, this term should not be applied to players who make use of any built-in Continue feature, if available.
    • Even so, note that abusing Continues multiple times is still a major breach of manners.

  • 回し・回しプレイ [mawashi or mawashi PUREI] - A situation where a group of players hog the machine, taking turns within the group. 回し (in turn) プレイ (play).
    • Outnumbering others do not equate to a right to hog the machine. In a sense, this is even worse manners than 連コ. If there is someone outside the group who wants to play, try to prioritize them first.

  • クラッシャー [KURASSHAA] - Crasher. Or a destroyer.
    • Essentially, a player who uses strength far in excess than needed and ends up damaging the buttons on the machine.
    • Some arcades have been known to ban or fine crashers as a form of punishment.

  • 台バン・台パン [daiBAN or daiPAN] - The act of unnecessarily hitting the machine. 台 (machine) バン or パン (sound of hitting).
    • Kicking also applies. Putting manners aside, this can be considered as serious as a criminal act (vandalism).
    • Unlike a crasher who damages the machine accidentally, this kind of behavior is clearly intentional.
    • Being banned, fined, or forcing the arcade to remove the machine are all possibilities so do not do this under any circumstances.

  • 晒し台 [sarashidai] - An arcade machine that simultaneously displays the game's video feed onto separate monitors. 晒し (public display) 台 (machine).
    • Functions like any other DIVA AC machines, but allowing other players to see the gameplay on separate monitors.
    • Often used for games with high visual quality or games that are hard to observe from the side.
    • It is easy to become nervous when confronted with so many people watching the game, but it is surprisingly difficult to track the contents of the play itself, so relax and play as normal.

  • 捨てゲー [suteGEE] - Purposely giving up in the middle of a song to get a quick and early Game Over. 捨て (abandoned) ゲー (game).
    • For example, hitting a SAFE in the middle of a PERFECT CLEAR TRIAL on the second song, with little point playing further.
    • The merit of practicing this is that turns circulate quickly so more players will get their chances faster.
    • The demerit is plainly that it is a waste of credits and will invite disgusted stares from those who cannot afford to do the same (like students).
    • Therefore it is best done when there are no waiting players, to get in some quick consecutive games.
    • On Finish Mode, make sure not to attempt this as there will be no early Game Over, so it becomes a complete waste of time.

  • 理論値 [rironchi] - Theoretical highest possible value for the completion rate.
    • Calculated principally from perfect end scores.
    • Factoring in Hold notes, even hitting all-COOL does not necessarily equate to this theoretical value. There are songs that require hitting WORST or red COOL at specific parts.

  • CN・PN - Abbreviations used for names.
    • CN - Card Name (abbr).
    • PN - Player Name (abbr).
    • In the arcade context, both are used interchangeably.

  • EX - EXTREME (abbr).
    • This, of course, refers to the highest difficulty for songs.
    • With respect to how the difficulty buttons are colored, some players have taken to calling it 赤 (aka) - red.
    • As for the other difficulties:
      • H/HD/黄 (ki) - HARD (yellow)
      • N/NM/緑 (midori) - NORMAL (green)
      • E/青 (ao) - EASY (blue)

  • 羽織・和尚 [haori or oshou] - A play style involving 2 or more players cooperating.
    • There is this persistent image of 3 elementary school or junior high school girls cooperating to hit all 9 buttons on the Pop'n Music arcade machine regardless of which arcade you visit.
    • This could also happen when an experienced player wants to help out a newer player, when a group of friends are having random fun, or even as part of a shop event.
    • Of course, this is also the last resort for players who absolutely need to clear a song too difficult for them.
    • Because DIVA AC has an online ranking, playing this way in Normal Mode is considered as against the spirit of fair play.
      • While it doesn't happen often at all, if the players believe they might end up ranking in, it is best to play on Finish Mode instead.
    • On EASY/NORMAL, the experienced player would take △□ (the most confusing buttons for newbies) while the newer player hits the ×○ notes.
    • On HARD/EXTREME, all the notes appear frequently so even the experienced player can enjoy playing.

  • サブカ [SABUKA] - Sub-card. When a player starts using a second (or more) card in addition to his main card, the newer card is called a sub-card.
    • On competitive arcade games, some experienced players start to own sets of sub-cards to lure newer players into a game.
    • Sub-cards lose this purpose on DIVA AC since there is no head-to-head competition, but some players get them for a variety of purpose, such as:
      • Clearing all Perfect on the main card, and using a sub-card for score attacks.
      • Using a sub-card for playing on the machines at location tests (beta versions) so that the main card will not be locked out of playing on lower-version machines everywhere else.

Scoring/Rating Terms
  • コンボ [KONBO] - Combo. Short for combination. In music video games, used to describe hitting a chain of notes without missing.
    • In DIVA AC, a combo is maintained by hitting COOL or FINE notes.

  • フルコン [FURUKON] or 全接 [zensetsu] - Full combo. 全 (all) 接 (connect).
    • Achieved by hitting a combo from start to end for a song, receiving a PERFECT rating. Instead of using this term, players tend to use パフェ (see below) instead.

  • F - FINE rating. Note that F is also used occasionally to mean frame.
    • To get a PERFECT game, both COOL and FINE are similar, but for the purposes of comparing scores or completion rates, this is a useful term.
    • For example, F2 105.00% means hitting FINE2 with all other notes being COOL for a total completion rate of 105.00%.

  • 赤COOL [aka~] and 黒FINE [kuro~] - COOL or FINE notes that are hit with the wrong button. The colors change to COOL or FINE.
    • Hitting these will break the combo and ruin a PERFECT game.
    • Unlike a WORST, these still reward some score and raise the completion rate.
    • If certain of the rhythm but unsure of the order of notes, it is always better to just hit a wrong button, at the very least less life is deducted from the life gauge.
    • With ver.A REVISION1, these two notes have been changed to WRONG and WRONG respectively.
    • Even with this appearance change, the scoring mechanics remain the same. It can be considered a WORST that still scores points, as the result screen now categorizes it under WORST/WRONG.

  • SAFE - The meanie that shows up suddenly while aiming for a PERFECT game. It has been affectionately given nicknames such as SAFEタリ [~TARI].
    • If he shows up even once, your combo and PERFECT goes bye-bye.

  • 達成率 [tasseiritsu] - Completion rate. The value given as a percentage displayed on the completion gauge at the bottom of the play screen.
    • As long as no WORST are hit, all notes contribute to this. Hold bonus also apply.
    • This value is what determines the rating given at the end of the song.

  • ボーダー(ライン) [BOODAA(RAIN)] - Border(line). Translated on this wiki as borderline marker. The minimum value on the completion gauge needed to pass the song.

  • 閉店 [heiten] - A Game Over from having the life gauge hit zero. 閉店 literally means closing shop.
    • When this happens, a big FAILED will flash across the play screen.
    • Having a higher completion rate than borderline will not prevent this.
    • When Finish Mode has been chosen, this cannot happen.

  • 完走 [kansou] - To successfully finish a song without 閉店.
    • Even when a song is finished, if the completion rate is lower than borderline, it is still a Game Over.

  • ミステイク [MISUTEIKU] or MT - The MISS×TAKE rating given if a song was not cleared.
    • This is given whether the failure comes from insufficient completion rate or hitting zero life.
    • Most players simply use "not cleared" or "FAILED" so this term is not widely utilized.

  • クリア [KURIA] - Clear. This will net a rating of STANDARD or higher.
    • As this umbrella term covers PERFECT and GREAT as well, it is frequent to see players use "STANDARD" to describe a STANDARD clear instead.
    • Conversely, this term is not utilized to describe PERFECT or GREAT to prevent confusion.
    • A STANDARD clear will put a marker with the letter C on the song in the selection menu, so it is also common to see the letter C used to describe a STANDARD clear.
    • The abbreviation used for STANDARD is STD or スタダ [SUTADA].

  • グレ [GURE] - GREAT rating.
    • The letter G is also often used.

  • パフェ [PAFE] - PERFECT rating.
    • The letter P is also often used.

  • トラ [TORA] - Short for トライアル [TORAIARU] - Trial.
    • This is simply an easier way of referring to trials. Clear Trials would be Cトラ, Great Clear Trials are Gトラ and Perfect Clear Trails, Pトラ.
    • トラコン [TORAKON] means Trial Complete.

  • EXP and EXG - EXTREME PERFECT and EXTREME GREAT, used as counters for the number of EX songs cleared as either P or G.
    • Used in the form EXP50 to mean scoring PERFECT on 50 songs on EXTREME.

  • 理論接続・理接 [rironsetsuzoku or risetsu] - Theoretical full combo. 理論 (theoretical) 接続 (connection).
    • Used to describe when finishing a song without full combo, but having hit each note properly across multiple replays.
    • This term cannot be used to describe a song where the player makes a mistake at the same spot every time.
    • Consider these two situations:
      • ① The player misses a note at the start, but finishes the rest of the song on an unbroken combo.
      • ② The player misses a note at the end, but has been on a combo from the start until that point.
    • While the player has not scored a PERFECT, he has theoretically scored a full combo if plays ① and② are combined.
    • This term is frequently used in other music video games, but has little penetration into DIVA AC language, perhaps because a large portion of the DIVA AC player base do not play other music video games.

Gameplay/Hitting Terms
  • 初見プレイ [shoken PUREI] - A play where it is the player's first time seeing the notechart. 初見 (first sight) プレイ (play).
    • It is not exactly the same as a first play (see below).
    • On the higher levels of EX the notecharts become harder and harder to clear on a first sight play.

  • 初プレイ [hatsu PUREI] - First play. 初 (first) プレイ (play).

  • 粘着 [nenchaku] - To persevere on a given task. 粘着 literally means adhesion.
    • In DIVA this means to keep replaying a certain song.
    • Thus, it is mostly used in attempting to achieve a PERFECT or clear a PERFECT CLEAR TRIAL, when the player continues to replay the song until the goal.

  • 運指 [unshi] - Refers to the position taken up by a player's fingers while hitting buttons.
    • This term is also used by instrument players like guitarists.
    • When the fingers are hitting buttons in the regular position, it is also known as 固定 [kotei] (fixed).
      • The regular position is usually recognized as ○× on the right hand and □△ on the left hand.
    • In reverse, when buttons are being hit not in the regular position, it is known as 北斗 [hokuto] (Big Dipper).
      • It sounds cool only in name, because attempts to hit in an unfamiliar position often results in SAFE and red COOL notes that will quickly embarrass the player.

  • クロス [KUROSU] - Cross. When a player's two hands are crossed in the process of hitting buttons.
    • One can frequently see players crossing their hands while trying to hit other buttons in the middle of a Hold note. This is not considered as good positioning.

  • 踏み換え [fumikae] - To change fingers on a Hold button while keeping it pressed down.
    • This might happen when a player wants to free up fingers for other buttons while maintaining a Hold note.

  • HOLD入れ替え・切り替え [~irikae or kirikae] - A form of advanced play.
    • While maintaining a Hold note, when another Hold note appears, this technique refers to giving up the current Hold note to only maintain the newer Hold note.
    • This technique is utilized for score attacks (see below) to focus on Holds that give higher score bonus and any MAX HOLD BONUS.

  • 捨てノーツ [sute NOOTSU] - To purposely hit WORST on a note that should normally be hit. 捨て (abandoned) ノーツ (notes).
    • Another form of advanced play used for score attacks (see below). As before, the player's focus is on MAX HOLD BONUS.
    • A variation is to hit red COOL on some of these abandoned notes, but whether those are included under the term of 捨てノーツ is something still not well-defined.

  • スコアアタック・スコアタ [SUKOA ATAKKU or SUKOATA] - Score attack. A play style where the focus is only on raising the score.
    • The basic train of thought is to aim for sections where not exactly playing according to the music score can return a higher score.
    • Using the above two techniques (捨てノーツ and HOLD入れ替え), the theoretically attainable score is higher than what a PERFECT game is capable of.
    • There is no actual Score Attack mode in DIVA AC so do not search for it futilely.

  • ガチ [GACHI] - When a player does neither HOLD入れ替え or 捨てノーツ.
    • Also refers to songs where the notecharts leave little room for the above two techniques to expand the completion rate or score.

  • ルート [RUUTO] - Route. A notechart planned with either score attack or completion rate in mind.
    • Because 5% is the maximum bonus for hold bonus, there are many songs where the completion rate route is same as playing ガチ.
    • A completion rate route basically involves using HOLD入れ替え most of the time, but there are very rare cases where 捨てノーツ needs to be utilized.
    • It is also not unusual for both routes to be the same route due to the 5% limit for hold bonus.
    • Score routes are much more complex due to the calculation of individual note scores, but nearly all of them require mastery of HOLD techniques.
    • Some score routes will bring the player very close to game over due to life gauge, or end with a completion rate unable to pass the second song.
      • In these cases, it would be best to avoid the former on the first song, and avoid the latter on the second song in order to prevent wasted effort...
    • In descriptions it is sometimes represented as the symbol √.

  • ツバメ返し [TSUBAMEgaeshi] - A method of quickly releasing and hitting again a button that was being pressed down as a Hold note. 燕返し is a famous sword technique.
    • For example, in a situation of H , where there is only a tiny interval between releasing the previous Hold note and hitting the same button again, if the player wishes to maintain the Hold as long as possible. The finger maintaining the Hold should make as though to hit a button; the moment that finger is lifted, another finger can slide in to hit the button faster. As long as the button lights up before the second finger connects, this technique has been successfully executed.

  • トリル [TORIRU] - Trill. The method of continuously hitting a single button with 2 alternating fingers in rhythm.
    • A trill is a musical ornament consisting of a rapid alternation between two adjacent notes. In DIVA AC, the big buttons allow for rapid hitting with two alternating fingers.
    • The spherical shape of the buttons, the strength of the spring underneath, and the need to practice the stroke all contribute to making this method unexpectedly difficult.

  • 空打ち [karauchi] - To hit buttons in time with the BGM when there are no note markers, for purposes of keeping rhythm. 空 (empty) 打ち (hit).
    • This is of course assuming the player has button sounds enabled...

  • エアDIVA [EA~] - Air DIVA. For image training.
    • To play on an imaginary cabinet in front of the player.
    • This can be done while watching a video of someone else's game as a form of training.
    • Ultimately, this is still just training without the feel of the buttons, so it is normal when actual play does not go according to plan.
    • Translator Note: But a lot of us experienced players still do this a lot. Image training is enormously helpful in preparing for a song.
    • After replacing the buttons, some shops will setup the old, faulty buttons in front of a monitor showing someone else playing (see 晒し台 above). This is to allow players to practice. While the buttons are faulty, they are still the closest one can get to actual practice.

Song-Related Terms
  • 詐称曲 [sashoukyoku] - A song that feels way harder than the number of difficulty stars given. 詐称 (misrepresentation) 曲 (song).
    • While it is plausible that this term was derived from the original meaning of 詐称, the term 詐欺 [sagi] (fraud) is used for some music games.
    • In reverse, a song that feels much easier than rated is called 逆詐称 or 逆詐欺 [gyaku~] where 逆 means opposite.
    • On this wiki, these two terms are translated as Misrepresentation and Reverse Misrepresentation respectively.

Song Tags
  • Slow/Fast Speed - Indicates how slow or fast a song is, roughly based upon its BPM.
    • Slow Speed - BPM130 and below.
    • Fast Speed - BPM200 and above.
    • However, there are songs below BPM200 (e.g. BPM170) that still feels fast to most players, so those songs are designated as Fast Speed too. The reverse holds true.
    • Being too early on Slow Speed or too late on Fast Speed will result in SAFE, so adjust hitting speed as necessary.

  • Fake Slow/Fast Speed - Indicates songs that are supposed to be tagged Slow/Fast Speed as above according to BPM, but in reality is the opposite.
    • For example, あなたの歌姫 actually has double the listed BPM.

  • Speed Change - When the BPM changes within a song.
    • In Japanese, this property is also popularly known as ソフラン [SOFURAN], short for "SOFT LANDING ON THE BODY", a song from the arcade game "beatmaniaIIDX 2nd style" by KONAMI where the changing BPM was infamous.

  • First Attempt Killer - Songs that will almost definitely end in game over for a player attempting them for the first time.
    • While all songs will make short work of a player who has not reached the level of skill for them, this tag specifically indicates songs that will likely destroy an experienced player who is already used to the indicated difficulty level and has the skills for it.
    • The tags below all indicate factors that contribute to a song being difficult, so this tag will be reserved for songs that are so difficult overall that almost every player has the memory of failing it on their first try.

  • Difficult Rhythm - For songs where the rhythm is hard to grasp due to breaks in the music, multiple random beats, etc.
    • Many OSTER project will have this tag.
    • Other examples are the opening of Magical Sound Shower or the interlude of 孤独の果て where the timing is very hard to pin down if the player does not know the songs well.
    • Many of the songs with this tag magically become easy once the player gets to know the song, so simply listening to the songs often is recommended for new players.

  • Shuffling Rhythm - A subset of the above. Songs with jazz influence that skip or jump beats, making the rhythm feel entirely random.
    • The main culprit is ミラクルペイント, but a few other songs in triple-beat also share this tag.
    • Most of the songs in DIVA AC are written in four-, eight- or sixteen-beat so playing a song with this tag can be confusing for first-timers.

  • Difficult Notechart - Songs with notecharts that are designed to make it hard to recognize the next note marker.
    • A good example is みくみく菌にご注意♪ EX.
    • Notecharts that are difficult to read usually have many button varieties or they simply overwhelm the player with the number of markers and icons on-screen.
    • Reading ahead is the best way to surpass this difficulty, but if the player still feels overwhelmed, a simpler but more tedious solution is to memorize the more confusing portions of the notechart.

  • Difficult Segment - Songs that are easy except for a nasty segment whose difficulty level is high enough to result in a quick game over.
    • The ending segment of マージナル EX or the second verse of Magical Sound Shower EX are good examples.
    • These segments are usually short so memorizing them is a method of dealing with them.

  • Finishing Killer - Songs where the outro or final verse is accompanied by any combination of Difficult Rhythm, Notechart or Segment to give an unusually difficult ending.
    • Most of these songs are easy until the endings start, so players who have let down their guard will quickly find themselves overwhelmed.
    • For examples, look at ストロボナイツ EX or SYMPHONIC DIVE -DIVA edit- EX.
    • Players trying to clear these songs should remain alert at all times and deal with this segment calmly. Failing which, memorization is a last resort.

  • Chain - For songs where there are long chains of notes, lasting for an entire bar of eight-beat or more.
    • The most obvious example is えれくとりっく・えんじぇぅ HARD/EX.
    • The 3 tags below are subsets of this tag.

  • Mini Chain - Refers to a chain of 2 or 3 fast notes in a normal chain in (typically) twelve- or sixteen-beat songs.
    • This is not the same as a normal chain in triple-beat; do not mix the two.
    • For illustration, look at Ievan Polkka EX where chains of 2 and 3 rapid notes are mixed into regular chains.
    • Mini Chains in triple-beat conduct in two-, four- or eight-beat. Four of these are linked continuously in フキゲンワルツ EX but for technicality's sake, are identified as Mini Chains instead of regular ones.
    • However, Mini Chains in eight- and sixteen-beat songs are not conducted in triple-beat so take note.

  • Fast Chain - Refers to a longer chain (5 or more) of fast notes in twelve- or (less often) sixteen-beat songs.
    • Check out 多重未来のカルテット -Quartet Theme- EX or タイムリミット EX for samples.
    • As a comparison, the fast chain in Ievan Polkka (BPM120, sixteen-beat) is as fast as any regular chain in 初音ミクの消失 (BPM 240, eight-beat).
    • Also note that this does not equate to a regular chain that is hit quickly.

  • BGM Chain - Refers to a chain that should be hit at a fixed rhythm while ignoring the vocals.
    • Everyone's favorite 初音ミクの消失 and a few other songs.
    • Trying to judge the rhythm from the speed recitation would be suicide; it is much easier to focus on the background rhythm instead.
    • As an extra note, the music of 初音ミクの消失 EX is played in eight-beat while vocals are in twelve-beat so keep to eight-beat!

  • Multi Notes - Songs with notes that require hitting two or more buttons simultaneously.
    • Multi Notes with two component notes are connected by a red horizontal line. Their component buttons are positioned according to the layout of the physical buttons: △ left edge, □ between left edge and center, × between right edge and center, ○ right edge.
    • Multi Notes with three component notes will appear as triangles with each corner connected by red lines. △□× will appear on the left side of the screen while □×○ will appear on the right.
    • Multi Notes with all four component notes will appear as a square with each note occupying each corner of the screen.
    • While they appear in just about every song on EX, this tag only applies to songs where the Multi Notes are considered essential to clearing.
    • Multi Notes can also be hold notes (hold down all component notes to get a HOLD bonus) or partial hold notes (hold down only one of the component notes to get the HOLD bonus).
    • As can be expected, these are the hardest notes to hit especially when they appear in the below variations.

  • Vertical Multi Notes - Same as above, except that component notes are connected by a red vertical line.
    • Unlike regular Multi Notes, however, they can appear at any position on the screen, making it necessary to read the note carefully rather than just reacting to positioning.
    • Also, Vertical Multi Notes always appear as a straight vertical line, including those with three or four component notes. Coupled with the above trait, this makes them extremely frustrating to hit accurately for newer players.

  • Vertical Multi Chain - Vertical Multi Notes in a chain.
    • Like a regular chain, this tag only applies when the chain is long and rapid enough to be considered as one.
    • As such, songs like 星屑ユートピア EX or 迷的サイバネティックス EX with many Vertical Multi Notes but gaps between them will not be tagged as such.

  • Alternating Buttons - When some segments consist of just two buttons alternating irregularly.
    • Mostly appears in the harder EX songs.
    • For example, ×□××□□.

  • Sequential Buttons - Refers to when notes appear in these two sequence: △→□→×→○ and/or ○→×→□→△.
    • A very standard sequence in EX that can also be observed in some HARD songs.
    • They can be combined in any ways, such as △→□→×→○→×→□→△, or can be cut short, such as □→×→○ or ×→□→△.

  • Irregular Sequential Buttons - Very similar to above, except that the sequence is considered irregular because it does not start at the two end buttons.
    • For example, ×→□→△→○ or □→△→○→×.

  • Electric Fan - Also known as Washing Machine. Refers to that well-known sequence in 愛言葉.
    • It is a set of repeating Irregular Sequential Buttons where each note marker is positioned at the same spot as on a PS controller. The fanning in of the notes resembles a spinning electric fan.
    • A player seeing this for the first time would undoubtedly be shocked and is likely to lose both his cool and the game as well.
    • On DIVA 2nd, the notes (○→×→□→△) are positioned just like the controller, making this an easy sequence.
    • On DIVA AC, the notes (○→△→□→×) are now in the opposite direction and are part of an Irregular Sequence, so pay extra attention.

  • Tear Gland Malfunction - For unknown reasons, the lyrics and PVs of these songs have a huge tendency to cause the player's tear glands to malfunction and leak many tears.
    • Representative songs are ココロ and ハジメテノオト.
    • Certain songs are also said to ruin an otherwise perfect game because the final note is exceptionally slow. Tear Gland Malfunction frequently occurs in these situations as well but it is widely believed to be an independent cause.

Japanese Wiki Terms
  • 初音ゲーマー [hatsu otoGEEMAA] - A gamer whose first music video game is Project DIVA. 初 (first) 音ゲーマー (music video gamer).
    • As DIVA is rapidly attracting gamers who had never played other music video games before, this term was created as an abbreviation of めてゲーをプレイするゲーマー (gamer playing music video game for the first time).
    • This term originated from the abbreviation of 初音ミクのゲームをプレイするゲーマー (gamer playing the Hatsune Miku game).
    • The term is rarely used in its original way, but the meaning used is left to the context.

  • 他音ゲーマー [hoka otoGEEMAA] - A gamer whose first music video game was not Project DIVA. 他 (other) 音ゲーマー (music video gamer).
    • The term used to differentiate the gamers who are not 初音ゲーマー.
    • In contrast to that first group, most of these gamers have solid groundwork in gaming skills and techniques, and are usually well versed in gaming etiquette and unspoken rules of the arcade.
    • While individuals exist within this group who disregard their manners (crashers, smokers, etc.), the majority of 他音ゲーマー has an indirect responsibility in guiding 初音ゲーマー along the right path.
    • 他音ゲーマー should keep contact with 初音ゲーマー in a positive way, striving to create an atmosphere where both can enjoy gaming.
    • If direct conversation is not favored, making use of ゲーセンノート could be an alternate way of communication. ゲーセンノート [GEESEN NOOTO] (arcade note) is a notice board in a corner of an arcade, usually used by gamers sharing strategies, discussing new games, character artwork, arcade administrative notices, or even informing each other when they were taking their lunch break from gaming. This little-known otaku subculture is considered as an essential precursor to bigger networks of doujin groups, themselves triggering the rise of the otaku culture. With the advent of the Internet and all that entails, arcade notes have become redundant and the practice is unfortunately dying out.
    • Translator Note: Outside of Japan, how many newbies will spare the time to listen to veterans..?

  • みっぱい・@みっぱい [mippai] - Someone who visits the 2ch music video game board, DIVA AC thread.
    • Affixing @xx at the end of one's CN simply shows that one is associated with that particular term.
    • The number of people affixing @みっぱい at the end of their CN is increasing. どうしてこうなった。
    • Variations like @りっぱい , @でっぱい or @ちっぱい have been observed.
    • At this point, note that it is safe to assume gamers who have these suffixes are okay being approached for conversation.
    • On the other hand, it is best not to disturb gamers whose suffixes do not follow the @xxっぱい naming convention.

  • 裸イト - KAITO's male swimwear... 裸 (naked) イト (KAITO)
    • While his swimwear isn't really naked, the addition of his scarf makes him look strange.
    • This term is a portmanteau of HADAKA and KAITO.
    • Even if there were a naked KAITO with only his scarf on, it would be impossible to erase that existence. Just for reference.
    • The way to read this term varies between persons, usually being RAITO or HADAITO or HADAKAITO.

  • 埋め [ume] - To have surpassed a stated clear rating in a certain difficulty.
    • While usage depends on context, it is often used for the PERFECT rating.
    • For example, the phrase "EX all G 埋めた" means to have cleared all EX songs with at least a GREAT.

  • △□×○△□×○ - おちつけおちつけ [ochitsuke ochitsuke] (Calm down, relax)
    • This chain appears in the song どうしてこうなったEX in time with the vocals おちつけおちつけ.
    • When rage threatens to ruin any related threads, this term is used to calm the parties involved down.
    • おちつけおちつけ♪

  • ET - To connect one's fingertip with Miku's during the last scene of the StargazeR PV. Sample.
    • This obviously comes from the 1982 sci-fi film E.T. the Extra Terrestrial.
    • In the last scene, Miku stretches out her index finger towards the screen; the player responds by doing the same.
    • Change the choice of E.T. by changing the module used.

  • 鋼龍 [kouryuu] - To challenge a fellow gamer on one of the 2ch threads for a real-life game battle. Friendship might blossom.
    • There are groups calling themselves 鋼龍会 [~kai] with the sole purpose of training to be the best.
    • This term is a purposeful misspelling of 交流 which is pronounced the same way and means interaction.

  • Project DIVAは画面に人が入れる仕様にはなっておりませんので - Because there is no way for a person to enter the Project DIVA screen.
    • This phrase was coined when the 金の聖夜PV was first revealed on the official blog.
    • The emphasis on how it was impossible to enter the screen even while Miku was making inviting gestures, was one of spite and malice. From this source, various memes were created.

  • ヴェヴェヴェヴェヴェヴェドゥーンドゥーン [VE VE VE VE VE VE DUN DUN]
    • In the song Change me EX, near the middle (approximately 1:39), this refers to the note chain of □□□□□□ followed by × ×. Sample.
    • On HARD, this is ○○○○○○ followed by ○ ○.
    • No consecutive notes during this segment on EASY/NORMAL.